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We eat what we grow: food sovereignty, Sandinista Revolution

News from Nicaragua | Sunday, 19 July 2020 |

Members of the community of Marlon Alvarado celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution

Members of the community of Marlon Alvarado celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution

Testimonies of the campesinas of the Community of Marlon Alvarado

Today together with hundreds of thousands of other Nicaraguans, the rural community of Marlon Alvarado in the department of Carazo will be celebrating the 41st anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution.

The community, part of the 46,000 member Nicaraguan Rural Workers Association (ATC), is an outstanding example of how the principles of agroecology are being put into practice by campesinas as means to achieving food sovereignty.

More and more UN agencies, governments and civil society organisations are warning that one of the profound consequences of the coronavirus crisis could well be a hunger pandemic affecting tens of millions of people.

The ATC, as a member organisation of La Via Campesina, is calling for profound political and structural changes that ensure everyone has access to healthy, affordable food; that value workers and farmers; that localise supply chains; that use agroecological farming principles and that contribute positively to addressing the climate and biodiversity crisis.

In these testimonies the campesinas of Marlon Alvarado explain how the political commitment of the Sandinista government with a well-integrated, holistic programme of poverty reduction and rural development has accompanied their own sustainable farming initiatives.

……and above all why today they will be celebrating the 41st anniversary of the Sandinista Revolution.

Link to testimonies first published by Friends ot the ATC

https://friendsatc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ATC_Santa-Teresa_English-1.pdf

'We eat what we grow': the example of the campesinas of the Community of Marlon Alvorado

'We eat what we grow': the example of the campesinas of the Community of Marlon Alvorado