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Nicaraguan perspectives on Climate Change Conference (COP23)

News from Nicaragua | Monday, 4 December 2017 |

Patrica Espinoza, Executive Secretary, UN Framework on Climate Change, Dr Paul Oquist, lead Nicaraguan delegate to COP23, Maria Espinoza, leader of G77 and China

Patrica Espinoza, Executive Secretary, UN Framework on Climate Change, Dr Paul Oquist, lead Nicaraguan delegate to COP23, Maria Espinoza, leader of G77 and China

In December, 2015 Nicaragua refused to sign the Paris Agreement on the grounds that far more drastic action was crucial - particularly on the part of developed countries – to address climate change.

Nicaragua’s lead negotiator, Dr Paul Oquist, argued that even if carbon reduction commitments made by individual countries were met, it would lead to a catastrophic 3 degree temperature increase which would be ‘catastrophic.’

However, in October 2017 Nicaragua signed the Agreement as did Syria, leaving the United States in a minority of one.

At the Conference of Parties (COP23) in Bonn in November, there were significant advances in line with positions Nicaragua was arguing in 2015.

These include agreement on the following:

  • An agreement to set a more ambitious target of reducing temperature rises to 1.5℃-2℃.
  • Greater unity among developing countries of the G77 and China which will strengthen future negotiations.
  • Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) must be more ambitious and include concrete action to fulfil Paris Agreement targets.
  • A mechanism called the ‘Talonoa Dialogue’ was agreed with the objective of limiting further increases in global warming to ensure that Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) contain ambitious goals and actions to reduce emissions, especially of those countries most responsible for global warming.

Outstanding issues to be addressed:

  • Although progress was made on a Plan of Action to implement the Paris Agreement, the principles of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities still need to be included.
  • Consensus must be reached between developed and developing countries on pre-2020 damage and loss, financing the implementation of all aspects of the Agreement, and on sharing technology and expertise.
  • Guidelines must be negotiated to avoid politicising the allocation of Green Climate Fund resources.

Followup conference in Paris 12 December

Following the withdrawal of the US from the Paris Agreement, the European Union is taking a stronger leadership role in the process. The President of France is organising a conference with the support of the UN General Secretary and President of the World Bank to discuss pre-2020 action and finance. This is a critical area where there was unity among developing countries and ‘total intransigence on the part of developed countries.'

Link to full report on Nicaraguan delegation to COP23

Added documents: pdf file Download pdf file (459 kb)